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MASTER INDEX

GEM, MINERAL and
FOSSIL SOCIETIES


This page is dedicated to some of the Gem, Mineral and Fossil Societies in the United States and other important organizations in the areas of Paleontology, Geology, Mineralogy and other related areas of science.

Here you will find some information and web site links to the groups listed.



The main organization for many gem, mineral & Fossil Societies and groups (for brevity called RHGs to represent the generic "Rock Hound Groups") is the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies (which is abbreviated as the AFMS).

The AFMS is the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies, Inc. and its web site link is http://www.amfed.org/.
For more information on this web site, click herein on AFMS.

We recommend that read the AFMS Land Use Policy and the Code of Ethics.



The following are the Regional Organizations under the
American Federation of Mineralogical Societies, Inc.



The SCFMS is the South Central Federation of Mineral Societies, Inc. which covers Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and the 'Rollin Rock Club" (folks who travel around). Its web site link is http://www.scfms.net/.

SCFMS was founded in 1943 and joined the AFMS in 1953. It has approx. 40 clubs in the three States shown.



The CFMS is the California Federation Of Mineralogical Societies. Inc. which covers all of California, Nevada and has one club in Western Arizona. Its web site link is http://www.cfmsinc.org/

The web site reveals the following about the CFMS:

Following is a brief history of the California Federation of Mineralogical Societies (CFMS).

Mineral clubs were formed as early as 1885, when the interest in the earth sciences became evident, but the first club in California was not formed until 1931.
It was the Mineralogical Society of Southern California in Pasadena. As the hobby grew, so did the need for the hobby societies.


CFMS is comprised of Member Societies in California, Nevada, and Western Arizona.

Mineral Day, June 16, 1935, at the San Diego Exposition provided a time for representatives of several California Mineral Societies to meet and formulate plans to organize a state organization of mineral societies.

The first convention of the Mineral Societies of California was held on January 4-5, 1936, in Riverside California. The charter members were:

Kern County Mineral Society, Founded March 18, 1935 in Bakersfield

Los Angeles Mineralogical Society, Founded September 9, 1932 in Los Angeles

Mineralogical Society of Southern California, Founded in 1931 in Pasadena

Mineral Society of San Diego (now San Diego Mineral and Gem Society, Inc.), Founded March 1934 in San Diego

Northern California Mineral Society, (now San Francisco Gem and Mineral Society, Inc.), Founded January 16, 1935 in San Francisco

Orange Belt Mineralogical Society, Founded April 6, 1932 in San Bernardino

West Coast Mineral Society, Founded May, 1934 in Fullerton


The EFMLS is the Eastern Federation of Mineralogical and Lapidary Societies, Inc. whose web site link is http://www.amfed.org/efmls/

Here is information copied from the EFMLS Home Page:

The Eastern Federation of Mineralogical and Lapidary Societies, Inc. was organized in 1950 to bring about a closer association of Clubs and Societies devoted to the study of the Earth Sciences and the practice of the Lapidary Arts and related crafts in the eastern portion of the United States. Beginning with three "founding" clubs and seven "charter" clubs, the EFMLS has now grown to approximately 150 affiliated clubs and societies with a combined membership of well over 10,000 individuals. The EFMLS is a member of the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies, the umbrella association for the seven regional federations in the United States. It joined the AFMS in 1952.

Included are clubs, with over 10,000 members, in the following States:

  • Alabama
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Mississippi
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia


The MFMGS is the Midwest Federation of Mineralogical and Geological Societies whose link is http://www.amfed.org/mwf/. The MFMGS was founded in 1940 and in 1947 was one of the founders of the AFMS. In 2003 they had 6791 Adults and 611 Junior members, in 133 clubs in the following States (# clubs is show in {} ).

  • Arkansas {3}
  • Illinois {20}
  • Indiana {9}
  • Iowa {9}
  • Michigan {26}
  • Minnesota {10}
  • Missouri {12}
  • Nebraska [Eastern] {5}
  • North Dakota [Eastern] {1}
  • Ohio {19}
  • South Dakota [Eastern] {5}
  • Wisconsin {14}


The NWFMS is the Northwest Federation Of Mineralogical Societies, Inc. which covers Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and *Utah. Its web site link is http://www.amfed.org/nfms/

The NWFMS is comprised of 80 clubs with 5,500 members. NWFMS was founded in 1938, and one of the original four founders of the AFMS in 1947.



The RMFMS is the Rocky Mountain Federation of Mineralogical Societies, Inc. whose web site link is http://www.rmfms.org/. The RMFMS was organized in 1941 and was one of the original four founders of the AFMS in 1947. The number of clubs and members is not shown by AFMS or the RMFMS.

  • Arizona (except 1 club in the CFMS)
  • Colorado
  • Kansas
  • Nebraska (Western portion)
  • New Mexico
  • North Dakota (Western portion
  • Oklahoma
  • South Dakota (Western portion)
  • Utah
  • Wyoming



The SFMS is the Southeast Federation of Mineralogical Societies,Inc. whose area is a little more vague. Here is what
their web site states about their area, membership and other Home Page information. Their website link is http://www.amfed.org/sfms/index.html.

The Southeast Federation of Mineralogical Societies, Inc. was organized in 1976 to bring about a closer association of Clubs and Societies devoted to the study of Earth Sciences and the practice of Lapidary Arts and crafts in the Southeastern part of the United States. The Southeast Federation includes approximately 80+ clubs and societies mostly in the region east of the Mississippi River and South of a line following the northern boarders of Tennessee and North Carolina. **There are a few clubs outside of this area due to historical affiliation. The Southeast Federation is a member of the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies. The Southeast Federation of Mineralogical Societies, Inc. provides member clubs with an insurance program covering field trips, shows, club meetings , etc. and educational opportunities that constitute the real backbone of our federation. The SFMS sponsors five Gem, Jewelry and Mineral workshops each year. These are held at Wildacres, near Little Switzerland in North Carolina, and at the William Holland Retreat near the small town of Young Harris in northeast Georgia. A broad range of courses related to the lapidary arts are taught by qualified instructors from throughout the Federation. All instructors are volunteers who are not paid for the highly skilled and professional experience that they bring to the workshops.



OTHER IMPORTANT ORGANIZATIONS