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MIDDLE EOCENE - CLAIBORNE GROUP
STONE CITY BLUFF
[a/k/a WHISKEY BRIDGE]

Invertebrate Fossils
Burleson County, Texas


A collection of
Stone City Bluff
invertebrate fossils


       Possibly the most consistent place to find fossils is at what has long been called the "Whiskey Bridge" location. For many years the Geology Departments of Texas A&M and Texas University and other college groups, along with numerous Rockhound Groups, public schools and many, many others, have come to Whiskey Bridge to dig Invertebrate Fossils and ALWAYS with success. Whiskey Bridge is actually the bridge on Texas Highway 21, which crosses the Brazos River, between Bryan, Texas in Brazos County and Caldwell in Burleson County.

       To get to the location, from Houston say, You travel West on I.H. 290 Northwest to State Highway 6, then North on Texas Highway 6 into or around Bryan, Texas (there is a Bypass). You then turn West Southwest on State Highway 21, headed toward Caldwell. The Stone City Bluff is the Western bank of the Brazos River just Northwest of Whiskey Bridge. Once you cross the Brazos River Bridge, you will see where cars for many years have been pulling off the road and circling back to a parking area. From your car you walk back toward the Bride and down poison ivy infested paths (why the dickens don't we all carry weed killer and end this menace). The path will lead you somewhat East and then Northward and downward to the West bank of the Brazos River.

       All along this West bank of the Brazos River for hundreds if not thousands of feet, the soil (which is harder than regular garden soil, but not too difficult to get into) is infested with many species of Eocene Age shells. Middle Eocene is something like 40 -45 MYA.

       The latest and probably the most thorough handling of the many species of invertebrates in the Stone City Formation is the book and corresponding disks created by John and Barbara "Bobbie" Emerson, long time members of the Houston Gem & Mineral Society. Their book is amazingly called "Middle Eocene Claiborne Group Invertebrate Fossils from Stone City Bluff, Burleson County, Texas. You can see more information and purchase their book and/or disk on their website, which is http://iftx.com.



       Now if you would like to see some of the specimens from your Curator's private collection, on loan to the Proctor Museum of Natural Science, here are a few:

NOTE: below most specimens appear first the Genus (starts with a capital letter) and species {starts with a small letter} followed by the Class and Family names [both start with a capital letter]

Terry Stiles Ranch on the
Brazos River, near the Stone
City Formation with group
from Houston Gem & Mineral
Society and the Proctor

Museum of Natural Science
Terry Stiles Ranch on the
Brazos River,
near the Stone
City
Formation with group
from Houston Gem & Mineral
Society and the Proctor
Museum of Natural Science
Terry Stiles Ranch on the
Brazos River,
near the Stone
City
Formation with group
from Houston Gem & Mineral
Society and the Proctor
Museum of Natural Science
Ancilla staminea
Gastropoda Olividae
(Olive Shell)
Anomia ephippioides
Bivalvia Anomiidae
Architectonica scrobiculata
Gastropoda Architectonicidae
Conus (Lithoconus)
sauridens
Gastropoda Conidae
(Cone Shell)
{this was a baby cone shell}
Belosaepia veatchi
Cephalopoda Sepiidae
(Squid Beak)
{a belemnoid--probably
resembled and lived like
a modern squid}
Conus (Lithoconus)
sauridens
Gastropoda Conidae
(Cone Shell)
{I consider this my best specimen
from the Stone City Formation}
This specimen could be either a
Lunulites bouei OR
a Schizorthosecos interstitial
Gymnolaemata Lunulitidae
or Orbitulipordae
Here are three Otoliths
(fish ear bones)
{Therefore these come
from a vertebrate}
Sinum arctatum
Gastropoda Natalidae
Protosurcula gabbi
Gastropoda Turridae
(a Turretella Shell)
A collection of
Stone City Bluff
invertebrate fossils
(except for the squid beak)
Venericardia (Venericor) densata
Bivalvia Carditidae