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MASTER INDEX by
SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION


FOR SCIENTIFIC AND ADVANCED STUDY



Dividing living things by groups is not a simple process. Quoting from Wikipedia in the next section demonstrates some of this disparity in designations:

From biological taxonomy, a kingdom or regnum is a taxonomic rank in either (historically) the highest rank, or (in the new three-domain system) the rank below domain. Each kingdom is divided into smaller groups called phyla (or in some contexts these are called "divisions"). Currently, textbooks from the United States use a system of six kingdoms (Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista, Archaea, and Eubacteria), while British and Australian textbooks describe five kingdoms (Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista, and Prokaryota or Monera).

Carolus Linnaeus distinguished two kingdoms of living things: Animalia for animals and Vegetabilia for plants (Linnaeus also treated minerals, placing them in a third kingdom, Mineralia). Linnaeus divided each kingdom into classes, later grouped into phyla for animals and divisions for plants.

It gradually became apparent how important the prokaryote/eukaryote distinction is, and Stanier and van Niel popularized Edouard Chatton's proposal in the 1960s.[1]

For purposes of this website, we will use the U.S. six kingdoms division. Since Arthropods make up 80% of the Animal Kingdom, we shall not use six columns of listing. Instead we will use one column for the Animal Kingdom, one for the Plant Kingdom and one for the other four Kingdoms: Fungi, Protista, Archaea and Eubacteria.



ANIMAL KINGDOM PLANT KINGDOM FOUR OTHER KINGDOMS
FUNGI, PROTISTA,
ARCHAEA & EUBACTERIA